Tree ring dating and archaeology


We can see this in any tree stump, a series of concentric rings circling the heart wood and fanning out towards the edge.



There are no degrees in dendrochronology because though it is useful across the board, the method itself is fairly limited.Wood is a solid and strong material as we all know, valued for its longevity and strength.Each season of growth (typically annual but not always, we will examine this problem later) a new ring is set down in the body of the tree.From the 1980s, several seminal studies began at the University of Arizona (6), (7) studying the bristlecone pine of California and hohenheim oak in Germany.

Thanks to the work of these studies, we now have an 8,600 year chronology for the bristlecone pine and in the region of 12,500 year chronology for the oak.

We can date organic archaeological material and create a chronological record against which artefacts can be dated (3).